Complete Health & Fitness Newsletter
16 January 2016

SHORT BURSTS OF HIGH-INTENSITY EXERCISE DOES MORE FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES

Short bursts of high-intensity exercise improved cholesterol, blood sugar and weight among Type 2 diabetes patients more than 30 minutes of sustained, lower-intensity exercise. Burst exercise patients experienced more than a two-fold greater improvement in HbA1c levels which is a measure of blood sugar levels and greater reductions in body mass index.
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SUGAR-SWEETENED DRINKS LINKED TO INCREASED VISCERAL FAT

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.  Researchers said this study adds another piece of evidence to the growing body of research suggesting that regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption may be harmful to our health.
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NEW RESEARCH EXPOSES THE HEALTH RISKS OF FRUCTOSE AND SUGARY DRINKS

There is compelling evidence that drinking too many sugar-sweetened beverages, which contain added sugars in the form of high fructose corn syrup or table sugar (sucrose), can lead to excess weight gain and a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a new review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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WESTERN DIET MAY INCREASE RISK OF DEATH AFTER PROSTATE CANCER DIAGNOSIS

A new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that men who ate mostly a Western diet (red and processed meat, high-fat dairy foods, and refined grains) had two-and-a-half times higher risk of prostate cancer-related death—and a 67% increased risk of death from any cause—than those in the lowest quartile. Men who ate mostly a “prudent” diet (rich in vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, and healthy oils) had a 36% lower risk of death from all causes.
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EXERCISE HAS NUMEROUS BENEFICIAL EFFECTS ON BRAIN HEALTH AND COGNITION

In a review article highlighting the results of more than a hundred recent human and animal studies, findings show that aerobic exercise is important for getting a head start during childhood on cognitive abilities that are important throughout life. For example, physical inactivity is associated with poorer academic performance and results on standard neuropsychological tests, while exercise programs appear to improve memory, attention, and decision-making. These effects also extend to young and elderly adults, with solid evidence for aerobic training benefiting executive functions, including multi-tasking, planning, and inhibition, and increasing the volume of brain structures important for memory. 
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Healthy Recipe - Egg Frittata

The classic egg-based dish enriched with savory vegetables.
Get the recipe >